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We have no association and hold no responsibility for the links on this site! No part sex chat transcript this website can be copied without our permission! Bridget Jones’s Diary Script – Dialogue Transcript Voila!

Finally, the Bridget Jones’s Diary script is here for all you quotes spouting fans of the movie based on the Helen Fielding book starring Renee Zellweger, Colin Firth, Hugh Grant, etc. Swing on back to Drew’s Script-O-Rama afterwards for more free movie scripts! Once again, I found myself on my own and going to my mother’s annual turkey curry buffet. Johnson, “misogyny is a cultural attitude of hatred for females because they are female”. Misogyny is manifested in many different ways, from jokes to pornography to violence to the self-contempt women may be taught to feel toward their own bodies. Though most common in men, misogyny also exists in and is practiced by women against other women or even themselves. Misogyny functions as an ideology or belief system that has accompanied patriarchal, or male-dominated societies for thousands of years and continues to place women in subordinate positions with limited access to power and decision making.

Dictionaries define misogyny as “hatred of women” and as “hatred, dislike, or mistrust of women”. In his book City of Sokrates: An Introduction to Classical Athens, J. Roberts argues that older than tragedy and comedy was a misogynistic tradition in Greek literature, reaching back at least as far as Hesiod. The other surviving use of the original Greek word is by Chrysippus, in a fragment from On affections, quoted by Galen in Hippocrates on Affections. Plutarch’s Parallel Lives, where it is used as the title of Heracles in the history of Phocion.

Cicero reports that Greek philosophers considered misogyny to be caused by gynophobia, a fear of women. Greeks give the name of philogyneia: and thus all other diseases and sicknesses are generated. Cicero, Tusculanae Quaestiones, 1st century BC. In summary, Greek literature considered misogyny to be a disease—an anti-social condition—in that it ran contrary to their perceptions of the value of women as wives and of the family as the foundation of society. These points are widely noted in the secondary literature. In Misogyny: The World’s Oldest Prejudice, Jack Holland argues that there is evidence of misogyny in the mythology of the ancient world. In his book The Power of Denial: Buddhism, Purity, and Gender, professor Bernard Faure of Columbia University argued generally that “Buddhism is paradoxically neither as sexist nor as egalitarian as is usually thought.

While some scholars see Buddhism as part of a movement of emancipation, others see it as a source of oppression. Differences in tradition and interpretations of scripture have caused sects of Christianity to differ in their beliefs with regard their treatment of women. In The Troublesome Helpmate, Katharine M. Rogers argues that Christianity is misogynistic, and she lists what she says are specific examples of misogyny in the Pauline epistles. The foundations of early Christian misogyny — its guilt about sex, its insistence on female subjection, its dread of female seduction — are all in St.

Ruthven’s Feminist Literary Studies: An Introduction, Ruthven makes reference to Rogers’ book and argues that the “legacy of Christian misogyny was consolidated by the so-called ‘Fathers’ of the Church, like Tertullian, who thought a woman was not only ‘the gateway of the devil’ but also ‘a temple built over a sewer’. However, some other scholars have argued that Christianity does not include misogynistic principles, or at least that a proper interpretation of Christianity would not include misogynistic principles. In Christian Men Who Hate Women, clinical psychologist Margaret J. Rinck has written that Christian social culture often allows a misogynist “misuse of the biblical ideal of submission”.

However, she argues that this a distortion of the “healthy relationship of mutual submission” which is actually specified in Christian doctrine, where “ove is based on a deep, mutual respect as the guiding principle behind all decisions, actions, and plans”. The 34th verse is a key verse in feminist criticism of Islam. Shariah law in most “Muslim” countries, Islam is synonymously known as a promoter of misogyny in its worst form. Webber have written that Guru Nanak, the founder of the Sikh faith tradition, was a “fighter for women’s rights” that was “in no way misogynistic” in contrast to some of his contemporaries. In his book Scientology: A New Slant on Life, L.